Slackware64: Installing Slackware 14.1

Long waited new version of Slackware 14.1 was released a few days ago (11/07/2013). I also read a report from Alien Bob about this new version and it looks promising as ever!

Here is a screen shot of my slackware64 14.1 in vm client

slacky64

Disclaimer:
The information below is the result of my researches in the Internet and of my experiences. It is solely used for my purpose and may not be suitable for others.

Installing Slackware64 14.1

The installation of this version of Slackware is pretty much the same as previous ones. If you have ever installed Slackware before, there is no surprise. Slackware uses a non-graphical installer. If this is your first try, you may feel a bit overwhelmed but it is really easy to understand.

The most tricky part may be creating partitions with 'fdisk' or 'cfdisk'.

slackware64_partition

I'm used to 'fdisk' so I just run the command: root@slackware:/# fdisk [path_to_drive] Command (m for help): n Partition type: p primary (0 primary, 0 extended, 4 free) e extended Select (default p) p Partition number (1-4, default 1): 1 First sector (2048-41943039, default 2048): 2048 Last sector, +sectors or +size{K,M,G} (2048-41943039, default 41943039): +2G Partition 1 of type Linux and of size 2 GiB is set Command (m for help): n Partition type: p primary (0 primary, 0 extended, 4 free) e extended Select (default p) p Partition number (1-4, default 2): 2 First sector (4196352-41943039, default 4196352): 4196352 Using default value 4196352 Last section, +sectors or +size{K,M,G} (4196352-41943039, default 41943039): 41943039 Using default value 41943039 Partition 2 of type Linux and of size 18 GiB is set Command (m for help): t Partition number (1-4): 1 Hex code (type L to list codes): 82 Changed system type of partition 1 to 82 (Linux swap) Command (m for help): a Partition number (1-4): 2 Command (m for help): w The partition table has been altered! Calling ioctl() to re-read partition table. Syncing disks. root@slackware:/#

After partitioning, run 'setup' to start the setup program.

Addswap:
This enables a selected partition as swap partition. In my case, it's /dev/sda1. The swap partition is an independent section of the hard disk used solely for swapping. Swapping is the process whereby a page of memory is copied to the pre-configured space on the hard disk to free up that page of memory. The combined sizes of the physical memory and the swap space is the amount of virtual memory available.

Linux installation partition:
Next step is to select a partition to install root Slackware files. In my case, I have only one partition to select, /dev/sda2.

Format partition:
Select "Format" to format above selected partition.

Select filesystem:
I choose ext4 filesystem. Ext4 is an advanced level of the ext3 filesystem which incorporates scalability and reliability enhancements for supporting large filesystems (64 bit) in keeping with increasing disk capacities and state-of-the-art feature requirements.

Source media selection:
Select "Install from a Slackware CD or DVD.

Package selection:
I choose the default selection.

Select Installation mode:
I choose "full" to install everything.

USB flash boot:
After the packages installation, it'll ask you whether you want to boot from a USB device. This is surely an option if you don't use LILO or traditional boot loader, but I use LILO to boot the system so I skip this section by selecting "Skip".

Install LILO:
LILO is a Linux Loader which boots the Linux kernel. The setup program offers a few options here. "Simple" and "Expert". Simple installation automatically tries to identify installed OS(es) and enables you to choose. "Export" installation allows you to edit the lilo.conf file. Since I'll have only one OS on this system, the simple method suffices.

Select frame buffer console for LILO to use:
I do not much care about the frame buffer console so I choose the standard.

Kernel parameters for LILO
No extra parameters are needed.

UTF-8 text console
I choose "No".

LILO installation location:
There are a few options here but since I don't have any other OS, it is safe for me to install LILO in the MBR.

Mouse configuration:
I use a USB connected mouse so my choice here is "usb".

Network configuration:
From here on there are questions for network configuration, such as hostname, domain name, network type (DHCP, static IP, etc).

Start-up services:
Default selection

Hardware clock:
The hardware clock is set to the current local time so my selection here is "No".

Timezone configuration:
I select "US/Eastern" here.

Default window manager for X:
Although I know I'm going to install Openbox for my window manager, I choose XFCE here. I used to like KDE but it's too fatty for me now. If you want, you can run 'xfwmconfig' to choose the default again.

Root password:
Choose some strong password for root.

DONE!
Now the installation of new Slackware is done. You can reboot the system and enjoy it.

If you'd like, you can follow my previous post, Slackware64 14: Post Installation Configuration.

That's all!
-gibb

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